Delphi Programming Guide
Delphi Programmer 

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Part I - Foundations
  Chapter 1 Delphi 7 and Its IDE
  Chapter 2 The Delphi Programming Language
  Chapter 3 The Run-Time Library
  Chapter 4 Core Library classes
  Chapter 5 Visual Controls
  Chapter 6 Building the User Interface
  Chapter 7 Working with Forms
Part II - Delphi Object-Oriented Architectures
  Chapter 8 The Architecture of Delphi Applications
  Chapter 9 Writing Delphi Components
  Chapter 10 Libraries and Packages
  Chapter 11 Modeling and OOP Programming (with ModelMaker)
  Chapter 12 From COM to COM+
Part III - Delphi Database-Oriented Architectures
  Chapter 13 Delphi's Database Architecture
  Chapter 14 Client/Server with dbExpress
  Chapter 15 Working with ADO
  Chapter 16 Multitier DataSnap Applications
  Chapter 17 Writing Database Components
  Chapter 18 Reporting with Rave
Part IV - Delphi, the Internet, and a .NET Preview
  Chapter 19 Internet Programming: Sockets and Indy
  Chapter 20 Web Programming with WebBroker and WebSnap
  Chapter 21 Web Programming with IntraWeb
  Chapter 22 Using XML Technologies
  Chapter 23 Web Services and SOAP
  Chapter 24 The Microsoft .NET Architecture from the Delphi Perspective
  Chapter 25 Delphi for .NET Preview: The Language and the RTL
       
  Appendix A Extra Delphi Tools by the Author
  Appendix B Extra Delphi Tools from Other Sources
  Appendix C Free Companion Books on Delphi
       
  Index    
  List of Figures    
  List of tables    
  List of Listings    
  List of Sidebars  

 
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Chapter 10: Libraries and Packages

Overview

Windows executable files come in two flavors: programs (EXEs) and dynamic link libraries (DLLs). When you write a Delphi application, you typically generate a program file. However, Delphi applications often use calls to functions stored in dynamic libraries. Each time you call a Windows API function directly, you actually access a dynamic library. It is easy to generate a DLL in the Delphi environment. However, some problems can arise due to the nature of DLLs. Writing a dynamic library in Windows is not always as simple as it seems, because the dynamic library and the calling program need to agree on calling conventions, parameter types, and other details. This chapter covers the basics of DLL programming from the Delphi point of view.

The second part of the chapter will focus on a specific type of dynamic link library: the Delphi package. Packages in Delphi provide a good alternative to plain DLLs, although not so many Delphi programmers take advantage of them outside the realm of component writing. Here I'll share with you some tips and techniques for using packages to partition a large application.


 
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